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Mobile Technology Use in Law Firms

The use of mobile technology has enabled an increase in worker productivity and satisfaction in law firms today.  Lawyers can now conduct their business anywhere that their personal device is.  Having this type of freedom not only increases productivity, but it can also lower technology costs for the law firm.  Law offices where lawyers and their counsel are able to use their personal technology in their work need to ascertain that there are protection and safety measures in place by having a Bring Your Own Device Policy (BYOD) in place prior to the use of any personal devices to conduct business for the firm.  A solid BYOD policy should include the following:

  • Prohibit any off-the-clock e-mail access and/or work using any personal device by non-exempt (hourly) employees unless prior authorization is given.
  • Have a well defined employees’ rights and responsibilities policy on privacy expectations with regard to the use of their personal device when conducting business.
  • Structure solid data security and protection measures to ensure that confidential data is safe and secure at all times. A system of complex password protection, ongoing training, and an internal/external network audit are just a few things that will help.
  • Implement clear and firm policies and procedures in the event an employee’s personal device is lost or stolen. Employees should also be advised that upon loss or theft of their device used for business, that they are required to report this to their employer immediately; and that company policy includes the complete wipe of the entire device.
  • Install and diligently utilize encryption software which enables the legal firm to remotely wipe any suspect device that is lost or stolen.
  • Restrict access to sensitive data.

Any law firms that allow their employees to use their own personal devices would be wise to have a structured BYOD policy in place in order to protect themselves and their clients.  As the old saying goes, “Better safe than sorry.”